environmental protection Tag

September 24, 2014

Emergency response: The pipeline industry puts itself to the test

What happens if a pipeline leaks in Canada? How will a pipeline company respond? If a major incident occurs on a CEPA member’s line, other companies show up to help protect communities and the environment. That is why CEPA’s members organized a joint emergency management exercise on Wednesday to test and strengthen their ability to…
August 19, 2014

Who Holds Pipeline Companies Accountable?

The answer to this question is simple: regulators, the industry and you. Canada’s pipelines are among the safest in the world. Between 2002 and 2013, CEPA member companies transported oil and natural gas with a 99.999 per cent safety record. Canada was able to achieve this record because of a system that holds companies accountable…
August 13, 2014

When a pipeline retires: 5 things you didn’t know

Pipeline companies have a responsibility to protect the environment and public safety when operating pipelines. They have that same responsibility when a pipeline is no longer in use. The National Energy Board (NEB) regulates the retirement or “abandonment” of pipelines that cross provincial or international borders. For this post, Alan Pentney, technical leader of engineering…
August 5, 2014

Pipeline regulations and wetlands: 3 questions answered

Wetlands in Canada (Source: Natural Resources Canada) Wetlands perform a number of important functions such as protecting water quality and providing habitat for at-risk species. The environmental importance of wetlands is so significant that they are the only ecosystem designated for conservation by international convention. When planning pipeline routes, companies try to avoid wetlands. If…
July 28, 2014
Agricultural Soil & Pipelines

Agriculture and pipelines: Protecting soil during construction

This post is part two in CEPA’s “Agriculture and Pipeline” series. Part one was about the steps pipeline companies take to protect agricultural land when planning, building and operating pipelines. Any farmer will tell you that good soil is instrumental to a quality crop. Topsoil, for example, contains valuable nutrients that plants need to grow.…
July 23, 2014

Agriculture and pipelines: How companies protect land

In order to deliver the energy Canadians use every day, pipelines often have to cross agricultural land. After all, there are over 160 million acres of farmland in this country, according to Statistics Canada. “Agricultural land is a valuable resource for all Canadians,” said Bernard Perron, vice president of project development with Inter Pipeline Ltd.…
June 25, 2014

How do pipeline companies protect fisheries?

Commercial, recreational and Aboriginal fisheries play an important cultural and socio-economic role in the lives of Canadians. Approximately 80,000 Canadians make their living directly from fishing and fishing-related activities. That is why pipeline companies work to protect fish habitat when planning and constructing pipelines that cross water.  Calum Bonnington is a fisheries biologist with GeoMarine…
May 12, 2014

Aboriginal communities and pipeline companies: Relationships beyond regulations

Consultation with Aboriginal communities is critical to any pipeline project that proposes to cross reserve or traditional land. Pipeline companies work with Aboriginal communities to select a route that minimizes the impact on the community and the environment. Regulations Aboriginal consultation is a regulated part of the pipeline review process in Canada; the Crown must…
May 7, 2014

Pipeline applications 101

We are on a quest to provide Canadians with a Regulatory Roadmap for understanding the rules that govern Canada’s pipeline network. A couple of weeks ago, we explained who decides whether or not pipelines get built. This week, we want to shed some light on what information is included in an application to build a…
April 30, 2014

Safe digging: More important than ever, easier than ever

When we see construction in our communities, it can be a sign of economic prosperity, which is a good thing. However, construction projects can damage buried infrastructure such as pipelines if contractors and homeowners don’t locate lines before the start of an excavation project. Mike Sullivan, executive director with the Canadian Common Ground Alliance and…