Do pipelines operate near farms and ranches?

With over 160 million acres of farmland in Canada, pipelines sometimes run through farms and ranches. CEPA members recognize the land, crops and livestock are the farmer’s source of income, and they do their best to protect the integrity of farmlands and ranchlands when crossing them. This includes pipeline operators limiting distribution to farm and ranch operations during planning, construction, operation and retirement of the pipeline.

Agricultural land is a valuable resource for all Canadians.

Working with farmers and ranchers

The farmers and ranchers who own the agriculture land that pipelines pass through are landowners – and partners in delivering energy. CEPA members work closely with them to ensure it is done in the safest, most efficient way, while protecting the integrity and productivity of the land. CEPA members seek to engage landowners in respectful, long-term relationships.

Operators work closely with landowners to avoid construction doing the growing season. Photo courtesy of Enbridge Pipelines.

Operators work closely with landowners to avoid construction doing the growing season. Photo courtesy of Enbridge Pipelines.

Members listen carefully to landowners to address their concerns on how to best protect their land.

Planning a route to minimize impact

CEPA members work with landowners to carefully plan a route to minimize impact to the land and their agricultural operations. For example, pipeline operators may use existing utility corridors or plan a route that minimizes pipeline length.

Environmental studies are completed to identify areas that need to be avoided, like sensitive soils and wetlands.

Protecting agricultural lands during construction

Operators create an environmental protection plan outlining what must be done to protect the farm or ranch during construction. The plan covers aspects like how top soil and subsoils will be replaced after the pipeline is installed, and where to leave gaps during construction to allow farm machinery and livestock to cross.

Equipment is thoroughly cleaned prior to arrival so weeds are not introduced or spread

Working around growing seasons

Operators regularly inspect pipelines and perform maintenance on all pipelines. In order to reduce impact on farming or ranching operations, operators work with landowners to schedule the work to take place around growing season.

Pipeline operators focus on building long-term, respectful relationships with landowners.

Pipeline operators focus on building long-term, respectful relationships with landowners.

The industry works hard to ensure the pipeline does not impact the farm and ranch operations.

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